About breams

Baby Boomer generation. Integrator of the disconnected. Engineer, BMW motorcycle addict and Iron Butt enthusiast.

1983 R100RS Install New Clutch

After I installed the flywheel, I’m ready to install the clutch. You can see how I install the flywheel here:

And, you can see how I removed the clutch here.

I decided to install all new clutch parts rather than have them rebuilt by Southland Clutch.  Here is a write-up showing how I install the clutch.

And here is a summary video showing highlights of the installation procedure.

VIDEO: 1983 BMW R100RS Install New Clutch

The 1981+ model year clutch is a different design than was used on the earlier model years. You can see how to install the earlier style clutch here.

Here are a couple pictures from the write-up.

Clutch Centering Tool for 1981+ Clutches

Clutch Centering Tool for 1981+ Clutches

Clutch Assembly Parts

Clutch Assembly Parts

New Clutch Bolts with Washers

New Clutch Bolts with Washers

Verifying Clutch Plate Sleeve Is On Front Side of Clutch Front Cover

Verifying The Sleeve Side Of The Clutch Plate Is On The Transmission Side of The Clutch Housing Cover

Clutch Centering Tool Installed

Clutch Centering Tool Installed

Clutch Center Tool Removed - Clutch Is Installed

Clutch Centering Tool Removed – Clutch Is Installed

1983 R100RS Remove Camshaft and Crankshaft

I remove the crankshaft to check the condition of the main bearings. In order to remove it, I have to remove the camshaft first. I use the tools I bought from Cycle Works to remove the crankshaft.

Cycle Works Stage III Tools

Cycle Works Stage III Tools

I asked Matt Parkhouse, a long time airhead mechanic who lives about two hours from me, to assess the condition of the crankshaft main journals and the main bearings. He found the front bearing was serviceable but the rear main bearing was just outside the maximum clearance. He replaced the bearing and now the front and rear main bearing clearances are close.

Measuring ID of Original Rear Main Bearing

Measuring ID of Original Rear Main Bearing

Since I have to heat the front of the engine block to 275 F, I removed the stater motor and crankcase vent housing hose so they would not be damaged.

Here is the block with the crankshaft and camshaft removed.

Engine Block Looks Empty

Engine Block Looks Empty

You can read about how I do this work here:

And here is a short video of the highlights of the work:

VIDEO: 1983 BMW R100RS Remove Camshaft and Crankshaft

 

 

1983 R100RS Remove Timing Chain, Crankshaft Timing Sprocket & Nose Bearing

I remove the inner timing cover to get access to the timing chain, the crankshaft timing sprocket and nose bearing, the timing chain tensioner and the chain rubbing block (aka, slide rail).

Inner Timing Cover Exposed After Electrical Components Removed

Inner Timing Cover Exposed After Electrical Components Removed

Inner Timing Cover Removed

Inner Timing Cover Removed

The chain, sprocket, nose bearing, chain tensioner and rubbing block wear and this affects timing. The wear can be great enough that you can hear the timing chain rattle.

What's Under The Inner Timing Cover

What’s Under The Inner Timing Cover

You can read about how I do this work here:

I made a short video summarizing the procedure that you will find here.

I will replace the crankshaft sprocket, nose bearing, chain tensioner, rubbing block and the internal components of the oil high pressure relief valve. I will post a separate write-up showing how I do that.

1983 R100RS Remove Diode Board, Alternator & Ignition Sensor

I am going to replace the timing chain, crankshaft sprocket, crankshaft nose bearing, and the front main seal. I’m also going to pull the crankshaft to inspect the main bearings.

But first, I have to remove the electrical components and wiring inside the front engine cover that includes the diode board, alternator and ignition sensor, aka, the “bean can”, aka, the “electronic points”. I plan to upgrade the alternator and diode board to a 400 watt system. I also plan on opening the bean can to lube the advance mechanism and replace the Hall effect sensors.

Here is the before and after pictures.

Diode Board, Alternator, Ignition Sensor Are Inside Front Engine Cover

Diode Board, Alternator, Ignition Sensor Are Inside Front Engine Cover

All Gone :-)

All Gone 🙂

You can read about how I did this work here:

And, I shot a video of this work which is a bit long at 20 mins.

VIDEO: 1983 BMW R100RS Remove Diode Board, Alternator and Ignition Sensor

My goal in the video is to explain more about what the wiring under the front engine cover does and how it’s routed, as well as show how to remove all the components, so that added to the length. I’ll try to keep future videos shorter.