1983 R100RS Install Connecting Rods & Cam Followers

I had the connecting rods inspected, reconditioned, and new wrist pin bushings installed by Tom Cutter at Rubber Chicken Racing Garage.

Connecting Rod Parts

Connecting Rod Parts

I did that since this engine has over 83,000 miles on it. As Tom said about the life of connecting rods:

“Metal parts get deformed when they get traumatized by 270 TRILLION
combustion cycles (4500 RPM, 60 MPH, 100,000 miles= 270 and more zeroes
than I have left in my computer.) Just a lotta lotta little taps will make
metal flow. In the case of connecting rods, that becomes manifested in
misaligned and ovalled bearing bores. Wristpins rock, both radially as well
as axially, which deforms the small-end bushings. That stuff needs
attention on a high-mileage engine reconditioning.”

Here is how I install the reconditioned rods and the cam followers.

And here is a short video summarizing the procedure.

VIDEO: 1983 R100RS Install Connecting Rods & Cam Followers

1983 R100RS Install Push Rod Tubes & Head Studs

I decided to install 9.5:1 high compression pistons used in the earlier RS engines instead of the original 8.2:1 pistons used in the 1983 RS motor. Due to variability in piston diameter and the tight clearance required with Nikasil cylinders, the advice of Tom Cutter at Rubber Chicken Racing Garage is to replate the cylinders with Nikasil and hone them so they provide the optimal clearance with the new pistons. So I sent the cylinders and new pistons to him to have this done, but before I did, I removed the push rod tubes and the head studs from the cylinders. You can see how I do that here:

Now I am ready to install new stainless steel push rod tubes and the original head studs into the cylinders.

Here is a link to the write-up.

And a short video summarizing the procedure.

VIDEO: 1983 BMW R100RS Install Push Rod Tubes & Head Studs

1983 R100RS Install Engine In The Frame

I always mark the installation of the engine back into the frame as a happy milestone. At last, entropy is being reduced along with the parts pile in the corner.

Here is a short video showing how I install the engine.

VIDEO: 1983 BMW R100RS Install The Engine In The Frame

And some pictures.

Frame Back From Powder Coating

Frame Back From Powder Coating

Frame Rails Protected with Foam Packing Wrap

Frame Rails Protected with Foam Packing Wrap

Engine Ready To Pickup And Install

Engine Ready To Pickup And Install

Engine Slides Into Frame At The Rear

Engine Slides Into Frame At The Rear

Front & Rear Engine Mounting Rods Installed

Front & Rear Engine Mounting Rods Installed

Engine & Frame Strapped to Motorcycle Stand

Engine & Frame Strapped to Motorcycle Stand

 

1983 R100RS Replace Oil Pan & Suction Flange Gasket, Get Oil Pan Mating Surface Flat

It’s time to work on the bottom of the engine.

Engine Block Securely Mounted On Harbor Freight Motorcycle Stand

Engine Block Securely Mounted On Harbor Freight Motorcycle Stand

I replaced the oil pan and the oil pump suction flange gaskets.

New Gaskets-Green Is Oil Pump Suction Flange Gasket

New Gaskets-Green Is Oil Pump Suction Flange Gasket

Along the way, I checked the oil pan to see if the mating surface was flat.  It was not, so I sanded it and now it’s flat. That should go a long way to ensure the new pan gasket does not leak.

Checking For Uneven Mating Surface On Oil Pan

Checking For Uneven Mating Surface On Oil Pan

The gaskets I need are included in the EMC engine gasket kit. I’m also going to replace the oil pan bolts and wave washers with new stainless steel hardware I got in the bolt kit  from “The Bolt Guy” for the RT model since I’m converting the RS to an RT, not that RT pan bolts are different from RS ones.

To prevent the threads of the stainless steel bolts from galling in the aluminum bolt holes in the engine block, I apply anti-seize. However, it’s a lubricant. Since the recommended torque for the bolts is 6 FT-Lbs, which is quite low, if I torque the lubricated stainless steel bolts to that value, I stand a good chance of stripping the threads. So I reduce the torque by 20% to protect the threads.

For low torque like this, I always use my INCH pound torque wrench.

You can read about how I did the work here:

And here is a short video summarizing the procedure.

VIDEO: 1983 BMW R100RS Replace Oil Pan & Oil Suction Flange Gaskets

1983 R100RS Install Euro MotoElectrics 400 Watt Charging System

I’m upgrading the charging system from the stock Bosch 240 watt alternator to the Euro MotoElectrics (EME) 400 watt, Type III charging system. This alternator uses the same design as the Bosch one with an electromagnetic rotor with brushes.

EME Type III 400 Watt Kit Components

EME Type III 400 Watt Kit Components

I also decided to replace the stator cover, part# BOALT-StatFram107Plus and also replaced the battery (+) cable and the voltage regulator sub-harness. EME provides two cable kits: one has the battery (+) and (-) cables, part# BCK-475216 and the other has the voltage regulator and the charging system wires that connect to the diode board, part# BOALT-HAR80. The kit has some of the same wires included in the Type III charging system kit and is for the R80. But the voltage regulator sub-harness is the same as the one used on the R100 and the R80 kit is less expensive than the R100 kit as it has fewer wires.

EME 107 mm Complete Stator Housing

EME 107 mm Complete Stator Housing

EME Battery (+) Cable

EME Battery (+) Cable Included In Battery Cable Kit 

EMC BOALT-HAR80 Wiring Kit

EMC BOALT-HAR80 Wiring Kit, BCK-475216

Here is what the completed installation looks like.

Charging System Installed On Inner Timing Cover

Charging System Installed On Inner Timing Cover

I documented the procedure here.

I also made a video summarizing the procedure and posted it to my YouTube channel.

VIDEO: 1983 BMW R100RS Install Euro MotoElectrics 400 Watt Charging System