Ride to 40th RS Anniversary Rally-1977 RS Break In Is Complete

After finishing the rebuild of this bike on July 21, I prepared it to ride out to the 40th RS anniversary rally in Harleysville, PA (yes, “Harleys” ville). I put almost 1,000 miles on the bike prior to heading to the rally and corrected a number of problems. I also set it up for touring by adding my old Garmin 2610 GPS, a set of Hepco-Becker panniers I had on the R75/6, my Wolfman tank bag, and a pair of Kathy’s Journey fairing bags.

Wind Deflector

Wind Deflector

Hepco-Becker Panniers

Hepco-Becker Panniers

Wolfman Tank Bag with Kathy's Journey's Fairing Bag

Wolfman Tank Bag with Kathy’s Journey’s Fairing Bag

Ready for Touring

Ready for Touring

I decided to name this 1977 R100RS, Gonzo. My wife and I have a habit of naming our motorcycles for Muppet characters, and after some thought, Gonzo seemed to fit this one.

I plan to ride on US highways on my way to and from Pennsylvania avoiding the “super slab” as much as possible. Unlike my Iron Butt rides, this ride will be leisurely with time to smell the flowers allowing five days to ride out and five to ride back.

I packed a maintenance kit with extra tools along with clothing and other essentials for a trip.

Tools and Spares List

Tools and Spares List

On Sunday I took a picture of the starting mileage and right at 8:30 am I got on US 36 no far from my home planning to stop about halfway across Kansas.

Starting Mileage with Gonzo Ready To Roll

Starting Mileage with Gonzo Ready To Roll

US 36 shares I-70 for the first 30 miles with the usual hurrying and scurrying traffic even early on a Sunday morning. When I turned onto two lane US 36 at Byers, CO I enjoyed the relaxed pace with no traffic on a beautiful sunny morning.

Riding on US 36 in Colorado

US 36 in Eastern Colorado

Sunday Morning Traffic On US 36 in Colorado

Traffic Conditions on US 36 in Eastern Colorado

There is race track on US 36 and I stopped to take a picture of the cars coming down a hill. I pulled over on the shoulder, put Gonzo on the side stand and got off to get a picture of it in the foreground with some race cars going by in the background.

Race Cars on the High Plains Race Track Along US 36

Race Cars on the High Plains Race Track Along US 36

I sensed something wasn’t right and as I moved my eye from the view finder, I could see Gonzo was rolling forward and starting to fall over on the left side. I dropped the camera and grabbed him from the right side, but he was tipped too far over on the left and I could couldn’t pull him upright. The best I could do was slow the fall. A slow motion CARUMMPPP followed as he went down on the edge of the top fairing panel and then lay on the side of the road leaking gas onto the shoulder. In my hurry to get the picture, I didn’t put the bike in first gear before putting it on the side stand. There was a very slight down hill grade and of course, it crept forward as I was framing the picture until the side stand folded up.

I quickly went over to the left side and pushed him back up on his feet (it’s good to know I still have the strength to pick up an RS with loaded panniers) and then put him on the center stand. The top left faring panel is scraped on the edge and has a crack and another hairline one above the turn signal. Those are exactly the places I repaired when I stripped all the body work off, so a previous owner had the side stand fold up too. There is the also the usual scrape on the lower edge of the valve cover. Gonzo is “broken” in at last 🙂 Yes, that’s a smile, not a frown.

Result of a Tip Over - Oooppps

Result of a Tip Over – Oooppps

When I finish a rebuild, I’m always nervous about getting dings or scratches on the finished bike. But, eventually, these show up. So I have come to appreciate the arrival of the first ding, scratch or dent because I don’t have to worry any more about trying to keep the bike pristine.

I built Gonzo to be a rider, not a hider. Although I would have preferred my stupidity didn’t result in damage to the fairing, I can’t let that interfere with the enjoyment of riding him nearly 4,000 miles over the next week and half. “Endeavor to Persevere”, as my Email tag line goes. So I motor off heading to Kansas.

Entering Kansas

Entering Kansas

1977 BMW R100RS Assembling The Bike From The Frame to The Gas Cap

I completed assembling the bike from the frame through the gas cap and put together a write-up that shows the order in which I assembled it. You will find the write-up here:

It includes assembly of the front forks, seat, fenders, battery box, installation of the handlebars and cables, and odds and ends that I felt were better covered in this write-up rather in a separate one following the parts fiche breakdown I use for cataloging my write-ups.  I include links to other write-ups where applicable to explain a particular procedure.

Here is a short video of a walk-around of the finished bike followed by some pictures.

Rear Cowl Decal and Roundel

Rear Cowl Decal and Roundel

Inspection Sticker, Tire Information Sticker, Seat Sticker

Inspection Sticker and Tire Information Sticker (From Heritage Stickers)& Original Seat Sticker

Cockpit with Instruments and Original Dash Stickers

Cockpit with Instruments and Original Dash Stickers

Carburetor, Tygon Fuel Lines, Engine Badge and Polished Engine Housing

Carburetor, Tygon Fuel Lines, Engine Badge and Polished Engine Housing

Clear View Windscreen with Stock Mirrors

Clear View Windscreen with Stock Mirrors

Finished Bike-Right Front

Finished Bike-Left Front

Finished Bike-Right Rear

Finished Bike-Right Rear

Finished Bike-Rear

Finished Bike-Rear

Finished Bike-Left Side

Finished Bike-Left Side

Finished Bike-Seat View

Finished Bike-Seat View

Finished Bike-Side Cover

Finished Bike-Side Cover

Finished Bike-Left Rear

Finished Bike-Left Rear

Finished Bike-Left Front Side

Finished Bike-Left Front Side

On a Test Ride to my Local Coffee Shop

On a Test Ride to my Local Coffee Shop

1977 BMW R100RS Installing the Fairing and Seat

I just published two new write-ups; one on installing the fairing and the other on assembling the cowl and seat and installing them.  Here are links to them.

Next, I’m working on a write-up that shows how I assembled the bike starting with the frame through the gas cap.

Here are pictures of the final results.

Clear View Wind Screen & Headlight Lens Installed

Faring, Windscreen and Mirrors Installed

Cockpit View

Cockpit View

View From Seat

View From Seat

Right Side View

Right Side View

Rear Cowl Decal and Rondel Installed

Rear Cowl Decal and Roundel Installed

A far cry from what I started with:

Headlight Panel Cracks Are Extensive

Headlight Panel Cracks Are Extensive

Headlight Panel Cracks

Headlight Panel Cracks

Top Side Panel Large Crack

Top Side Panel Large Crack

Windscreen Damage

Windscreen Damage

Seat Cowl Dent

Seat Cowl Dent

1977 BMW R100RS Cleaning Up The Electrical Wiring and Components

The wiring was in dire need of either replacement or refurbishment.

Starter Relay Contact Corrosion - Green and Gruesome :-)

Starter Relay Contact Corrosion – Green and Gruesome 🙂

Starter Relay Wire from Battery (+) Cable-Grungy

Starter Relay Wire from Battery (+) Cable-Grungy

Starter Relay Wires Removed (Brown Wires are Really Red)

Starter Relay Wires Removed (Brown Wires are Really Red)

I have posted two write-ups. The first is about how I removed all the wiring and electrical components.

The second covers how I refurbished the wiring getting rid of grunge, green corrosion and repaired terminals, and then how I installed the main harness, sub-harness’ and electrical components.

I also shot a video showing how I routed the wiring.

1977 BMW R100RS Install Connecting Rods and Top End

Previously, I removed the heads, cylinders, pistons, rings and connecting rods. I installed new rocker arm needle bearings to replace the broken bearing cages. I disassembled the heads and inspected the valves and seats. You can read how I did that work here.

You can read about how I did this work here:

Top End Rebuild Work

I had the Nikasil cylinders replated and honed to match the new high compression (9.5:1) pistons. I had the connecting rods refurbished and I had the heads rebuilt. So now it’s time to put it all back together again.

The cylinders had the push rod tubes and the two short studs at the 12:00 and 6:00 position of the heads removed, so I also have to install them.

I started from this:

Ready To Remove Heads & Cylinders

Ready To Remove Heads & Cylinders

Engine Out of Frame

Engine Out of Frame

Piston Crown with Carbon

Piston Crown with Carbon

Rod Components

Rod Components

Score in Right Cap Bearing Sheel

Score in Right Cap Bearing Sheel

Right Side Crankshaft Throw

Right Side Crankshaft Throw

Cylinder Grunge

Cylinder Grunge

Left Exhaust Lower Rocker-Recovered Needle Bearings and Cage Pieces

Left Exhaust Lower Rocker-Recovered Needle Bearings and Cage Pieces

Right Intake Rocker Busing

Right Intake Rocker Busing

Right Intake Rocker Shaft

Right Intake Rocker Shaft

Valve Assembly Components

Valve Assembly Components

And finished with this:

Push Rod Tubes Installed

Push Rod Tubes Installed

Piston with Rings Installed

Piston with Rings Installed

Sliding Cylinder and Piston onto Long Cylinder Studs

Sliding Cylinder and Piston onto Long Cylinder Studs

Ready to Snug Cylinder to Engine Block-Push Rod Tube Rubbers Started

Ready to Snug Cylinder to Engine Block-Push Rod Tube Rubbers Started

Left Head Orientation-Exhaust to Front

Left Head Orientation-Exhaust to Front

Top End Installed

Top End Installed

Valve Cover Installed

Valve Cover Installed